The new thrift shop in town

thrift store door

[UPDATE: This store is now closed]

It looks pretty official that the St. Paul Classic Cookie Company won’t be opening up at Smith and Curtice after all – a new tenant has moved into the space and opened its doors to the public.

The 3T’s Thrift Store is now open at 779 Smith. The location was previously home Affordable Coffins and Artery, which left over a year ago for a bigger space in the Midway neighborhood. The cookie shop held a lease on the space for the past year, but unfortunately never got off the ground.

I stopped by on Sunday and spoke briefly with Trinidad, one of the owners of 3T’s. He’s excited about the space and the traffic he sees going by on Smith, but is also well aware that a similar store was in the space a few years ago and went out of business in a short amount of time.

He said the store will be getting more merchandise over time, possibly even appliances at some point. Most of the items he’s currently selling were donated from friends, recovered from storage units, etc.

thrift store
If you need a blender, an overhead projector and a wicker basket to take it all home in, this is your place.

The pickings are a little thin at the moment – it’s basically garage-sale merchandise, but also at garage-sale prices. Like all good thrift stores, the selection is eclectic, functional and useful to the right person. Most smaller items were in the $1-$3 range, a kid’s bike emblazoned with Minnesota Vikings logos was for sale for $35. Trinidad says he’s willing to negotiate on prices.

It’s hard to tell based on first impressions how successful this store will be. Trinidad, who lives nearby, says he’s putting “everything he has” into the business. The hours, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily, are ambitious and will mean an “open” sign during times when most other shops in the area are closed (for instance, I Dream of Heels, next door, is only open on Saturdays).

At any rate – it’s good to see some activity inside a space that’s been dormant for far too long. Stop in and say hello if you get a chance.

Advertisements

West St. Paul Days parade coming to Smith Avenue

(Artist’s misconception)

Because of construction on Robert Street, the West St. Paul Days parade will be moving to Smith Avenue this year (and possibly for a couple of years after that).

The new proposed route will start at Charlton and Butler, travel down Butler to Smith, then follow Smith to Annapolis, ending at Charlton and Dodd (near Gallagher’s and Taste of Love). The parade takes place Saturday, May 18 17 at 1 p.m.

Informational meetings will be held at the Cherokee Tavern on March 18 for businesses and March 20 for the general public.

Haven’t seen any information on bus detours, but I have an inquiry into Metro Transit. I’ll post info as soon as I find out.

For more information, call 612-710-7043 or go to www.celebrateweststpaul.org.

map route

I can see my house from here: Neighborhood history revealed in aerial photos

The University of Minnesota has recently put thousands of historical aerial photos online, and a handful of the capture the Smith Avenue neighborhood at a time of historic transition.

The Minnesota Historical Aerial Photographs Online database has more than 113,000 images taken throughout the state over the past century. While not quite the same resolution as the satellite images we’re accustomed to today, the level of detail they reveal is remarkable.

I’ve posted some low-resolution screen captures below of some of the images depicting our neighborhood. You can click on some of the images to enlarge them a bit and explore in more detail. The links to the originals are also at the end of the post.

(Disclaimer – I’m not a historian. I’ve done my best to identify buildings based on what I know about their history, but feel free to correct or add additional information in the comments)

The earliest image in the dataset from our area is from 1923, showing part of the border area between St. Paul and West St. Paul:

1923 full
(click to enlarge)

For reference, I’ve zoomed in and labeled the portion around Smith and Annapolis:

1923 smith annapolis labeledThis shows the neighborhood in its youth. If you look closely you can see the building currently housing Amore Coffee (at the time, I believe, it was a drug store). At this point much of the area south of Annapolis is still farmland and orchards. You could buy a country house and still be walking distance to the streetcar. These were the suburbs of their day.

Fast forward to 1937, and we can see housing starting to move into West St. Paul (Annapolis Street is labeled). Much of the city’s walkable northern edge is taking shape, while the rest of the city remains largely rural. On this image you can see Robert Street, Thompson Lake on the right and Somerset Country Club on the lower left:

1937 full
(click to enlarge)

Zooming back onto Smith and Annapolis we can see how much has changed:

1937 smith annapolis labeledYou can see how quickly things changed in less than 15 years – the dirt paths, fields and orchards south of Annapolis are filled with new, tidy middle-class homes, and businesses are thriving at the streetcar terminus.

This image also gives us a look further up the street, at Smith and Baker:

1937 smith baker labeledAnother 1937 image includes part of downtown, decades before a big chunk of it was leveled by freeway construction and “urban renewal,” and back when Seven Corners actually had seven corners:

1937b full
(click to enlarge)

This view gives us a better look at the gas station that is currently home to Taste of Love bakery:

1937b smith annapolis doddAnd also the top of the High Bridge. You can’t see it here, but if you look at the original you can see the shadows of the bridge’s trellis supports over the Mississippi River.

1937b top of high bridgeAnyway. This is just a snapshot (pun intended) of what’s in the archive. There are more images of West St. Paul, including some shots of Robert Street in the 1950s, still wide open and rural, with nary a chain store in sight. Bill Lindeke of Streets.mn has used the database to show the evolution of the Ayd Mill Road/I-35E interchange (which provided the inspiration for this post).

I encourage you to check out the images for yourself and explore. Here are the links:

Minnesota Historical Aerial Photographs Online (full database)

1923 image of West St. Paul and the West Side

1923 image of the West Side

1937 image of West St. Paul

1937 image of the West Side